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Czech Constitutional Court rejects complaint on data retention

Czech EDRi member Iuridicum Remedium (IuRe) has fought for 14 years against Czech implementation of the controversial EU data retention Directive which was declared invalid by the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU). After years of campaigning and many hard legislative battles, the fight has finally come to an end: on 22 May 2019, the Czech Constitutional Court rejected IuRe's proposal to declare the Czech data retention law unconstitutional. The court ended up rejecting the claim, despite it being supported by 58 deputies of the parliament across the political spectrum.

In the Czech Republic, data retention legislation was first adopted in 2005. In March 2011, the Constitutional Court upheld first IuRe's complaint on original data retention legislation and canceled it. In 2012, however, a new legal framework was adopted to implement the EU Data Retention Directive - that the CJEU found to contravene European law in Digital Rights Ireland case in 2014, and to comply with the Constitutional Court's decision. This new legislation contained still problematic general and indiscriminate data retention and a number of sub-problems. Therefore, even in the light of CJEU's decisions, IuRe decided to prepare a new constitutional complaint.

IuRe originally submitted a complaint to challenge the very principle of bulk data retention as massive collection and storage of data of people, without any link to the individual suspicion in criminal activities, extraordinary events, or terrorist threats. The CJEU already declared